Diseases and pests of economic plants of central and south China, Hong Kong and Taiwan (Formosa)
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Diseases and pests of economic plants of central and south China, Hong Kong and Taiwan (Formosa) a study based on field survey data and on pertinent records, material, and reports by American Institute of Crop Ecology.

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Published in Washington .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • China.

Subjects:

  • Agricultural pests -- China.,
  • Plant diseases -- China.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliography.

Statementby Herbert C. Hanson.
ContributionsHanson, Herbert C. 1891-
Classifications
LC ClassificationsSB605.C55 A7
The Physical Object
Pagination184 p.
Number of Pages184
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5890002M
LC Control Number63023850
OCLC/WorldCa2742372

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In this list of diseases the plants are arranged alphabetically according to their popular names. Although the paper deals primarily with fungous diseases, borers are mentioned as attacking Citrus spp. and thus predisposing the trees to the attack of fungi. Aulacaspis Pentágona, Targ., is recorded as causing severe damage to peach (Prunus persica).Cited by: Abstract In this list of diseases the plants are arranged alphabetically according to their popular names. Although the paper deals primarily with fungous diseases, borers are mentioned as attacking Citrus spp. and thus predisposing the trees to the attack of spis Pentágona, Targ., is recorded as causing severe damage to peach (Prunus persica). History Origins and spread Huanglongbing, or citrus greening, was first reported from Southern China in by American botanist Otto August Reinking who described a “yellow shoot” disease of citrus while evaluating diseases of economic plants in Southern China. A subsequent field survey conducted between and on citrus plants in. The food plants of an area provide the material basis for the survival of its population, and furnish inspiring stimuli for cultural are two parts in this book. Part 1 introduces the cultural aspects of Chinese food plants and the spread of Chinese culinary culture to the world. It also describes how the botanical and cultural information was acquired; what plants have 5/5(1).

  Back in , Hong Kong's economy was more than a quarter the size of China's and today, it's just %. Does the city's waning economic relevance to Beijing increase the chances of a military.   Make Hong Kong’s Economy Fairer. One of the potential reasons the government has generally chosen to maintain the status quo is because of the outsize influence of the business elite in the city. Disease burden: The social and economic impact of diseases. At present, NCDs are the main health threat in China. From to , mortality due to NCDs decreased from to people, while the proportion of NCDs increased from % to %.   The top 10 killer diseases in Hong Kong cause the deaths of 18 per cent more people a year than a decade ago because of the ageing population, unhealthy lifestyles and pollution, the South China.

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